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Showing posts from April, 2016

Book Review: The Lost Heiress by Roseanna M. White

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The Lost Heiress by Roseanna M. White Ladies of the Manor #1 Bethany House Publishers 2015
My Rating ✯✯✯✯✯
❤ Official Synopsis ❤
Brook Eden has never known where she truly belongs. Though raised in the palace of Monaco, she’s British by birth and was brought to the Grimaldis under suspicious circumstances as a babe. When Brook’s friend Justin uncovers the fact that Brook is likely a missing heiress from Yorkshire, Brook leaves the sun of the Mediterranean to travel to the moors of the North Sea to the estate of her supposed family.

The mystery of her mother’s death haunts her, and though her father is quick to accept her, the rest of the family and the servants of Whitby Park are not. Only when Brook’s life is threatened do they draw close—but their loyalty may come too late to save Brook from the same threat that led to tragedy for her mother.

As heir to a dukedom, Justin is no stranger to balancing responsibilities. When the matters of his estate force him far from Brook, t…

Book Review: Miriam by Mesu Andrews

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Miriam by Mesu Andrews (Treasures of the Nile #2) Waterbrook Multnomah 2016
More Info on Waterbrook's Website
My Rating ✯✯✯✯✯
❤ Official Synopsis ❤
The Hebrews call me prophetess, the Egyptians a seer.
But I am neither. I am simply a watcher of Israel
and the messenger of El Shaddai.
When He speaks to me in dreams, I interpret. When He whispers a melody, I sing.

At eighty-six, Miriam had devoted her entire life to loving El Shaddai and serving His people as both midwife and messenger. Yet when her brother Moses returns to Egypt from exile, he brings a disruptive message. God has a new name – Yahweh – and has declared a radical deliverance for the Israelites.

 Miriam and her beloved family face an impossible choice: cling to familiar bondage or embrace uncharted freedom at an unimaginable cost. Even if the Hebrews survive the plagues set to turn the Nile to blood and unleash a maelstrom of frogs and locusts, can they weather the resulting fury of the Pharaoh?

Enter an exotic la…

Jane Eyre read-along coming on May 29th!

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My friend Hamlette at The Edge of the Precipice loves her read-alongs and this one promises to be lots of fun!


Having never read Jane Eyre, I've always been curious how the book is when compared to the film adaptations that I love so much, mainly the Toby Stephens and Timothy Dalton versions. So this will be an enlightening experience, I'm sure.


I may not post my thoughts on the individual chapters here, but will on her blog. And I will definitely post a final review here. I encourage you, if you love Jane Eyre or want to read it for the first time in a group setting, come and join her read-along on this page.


In my mind I just know that I'll be comparing Jane Eyre with my thoughts on Wuthering Heights and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. The latter I really need to re-read one of these days and actually write a review of it since it's one of my favorite classics of all time!


So come join us! ❤

Book Review: Hard Winter at Broken Arrow Crossing by Stephen Bly

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Hard Winter at Broken Arrow Crossing by Stephen Bly Stuart Brannon Series #1 Crossway Books (1991) Reprint Greenbriar Book Company (2012)
My Rating ✯✯✯✯✯
❤ The Carissa Synopsis ❤
Stuart Brannon is in mourning and has been ever since his wife Lisa died in childbirth along with their tiny stillborn son. When a friend of his, Charley Imhoff, asks Brannon to join him at his gold claim in the Colorado Rockies, Brannon jumps at the opportunity to do something, anything. But now here he is, floundering through feet of snow and stumbling into a ripe fix of circumstances that won't thaw out until spring. Broken Arrow Crossing, a way station of sorts between civilization and the gold fields in Colorado, houses Everett Davis (also a friend of Charley's) who also happens to be back shot, a pregnant and abused Indian girl named Elizabeth, an Irish family by the name of Mulroney, an Englishman named Fletcher, and the Frenchman, Trudeaux. Brannon faces down his own fears, the evils that one ma…

Classics Club Review: Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte (1847)

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Read for The Classics Club  ❤
Ahhhh, the foolishness of back cover synopses' writers. My personal copy of Wuthering Heights describes the story as "one of the most unforgettable romances of all time." No. I tell you . . . no. This story is not, never was intended to be, never will be, a romance. Rather, it is a warning, a bell clamoring in your head to warn you away from making the myriad poor choices made by the characters in this story.

The story is this . . . Mr. Earnshaw returns from a trip to Liverpool with a dark-headed, evil-eyed little boy in tow that he names Heathcliff. The child had been abandoned and the man couldn't leave him to fend for himself (which is possibly the only kindness ever genuinely performed in the story). Heathcliff grows up beside Earnshaw's own children, Hindley and Catherine, and, despite his wildness, develops an attachment to Catherine and she to him. Bad news. Obsession, ravenous passion, and complete disregard for the wants an…

Author Meet-and-Greet with Laurie R. King

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Thanks to a good friend of mine, I attended an author signing/Q&A/reading with Laurie R. King in Denver on Friday night!
For the uninformed, she writes the Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes mysteries, and I think she has another series too, but I'm not sure what it's called.
Now, I've never read her books, but thought the event sounded like fun and it was . . . just a terrific way to spend an evening with my friend! If you're ever in Denver and get a chance to go to the Tattered Cover bookstore on Colfax, it is AMAZING. I highly recommend it, just to wander through in awe!
But back to Ms. King. 
Here's a few fun facts about her in regards to her work.
She does not use an outline when she writes. In fact, the closest she ever got to an outline was little 3x5 inch notecards. That didn't last. She considers the difference in authors that are for or against outlines to be simply a matter of "organization" vs. "organic." I thought that to be …

On Reading Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights

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Wuthering Heights is quite a story. Whereas with Lorna Doone I struggled with every sentence, I hardly want to put Wuthering Heights down, it's so dark and moody and intriguing. I'm about to chapter 11 . . . Heathcliffe has just returned after being absent for 3 years to find Catherine married to Edgar Linton. Her exuberance over Heathcliffe's return has already raised some issues with her husband (can't imagine WHY!)

Having never seen a film version in its entirety other than the 1939 version starring Laurence Olivier and Merle Oberon, I'm sketchy on the details of the ending. The 1939 version skipped a great deal, resulting in a cleaned-up, nicer version of the story and of Heathcliffe. I know it doesn't end well in reality, that's just a given for this story, but it's interesting reading a classic where I'm not 100% sure of the plot twists.

Things that have already jumped out at me are:

1) Catherine is a spoiled brat and I dislike her intensely. …

Poetry Month Tag

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Hamlette at The Edge of the Precipice is hosting this poetry month celebration so I figured I might as well start out with tag. Maybe I'll be inspired to read more poetry than I have for the last couple of years. I loved poetry in college!

What are some poems you like?

I love Goblin Market by Christina Rossetti. I also enjoy Tennyson's The Lady of Shalott.

What are some poems you dislike?

I'm not partial to any of Emily Dickinson's work, at least not at this point.

Are there any poets whose work you especially enjoy?  If so, who are they?

Shakespeare . . . always.

Do you write poetry?

I haven't in the last few years, but did write some when I was in college. They received good grades and I enjoyed writing them, but I don't make a habit of it, although I am considering a return to poetic writing.

Have you ever memorized a poem?

Yes, The Quality of Mercy by Shakespeare and then The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost. There were others I memorized in school, but those are long …